Welcome to the Landerholmstead

Welcome! If youre reading this, it means you are officially a part of a movement* to make the world a better place, one community at a time.

This movement is known as The Landerholmstead: a self-sufficient, alternative housing operation that offers homes to any individuals willing to contribute to the functionality of the homestead; individuals like students, homeless (including the outcast LGBTQIA youth), formerly incarcerated citizens re-entering society, immigrants, and anyone who wishes to live an alternative lifestyle.

We pledge to “utilize sustainable, natural practices fueled by permaculture philosophies to explore alternative living solutions and behavioral changes that encourage a resilient future for people and the environment.Learn the whole story.

This is what were working toward, and we have a lot of work to do before we get there. Rome wasnt built in a day, and a self-sustaining homestead definitely wont be either. Nonetheless, we are so excited to finally show all of you what were doing and why were passionate about it. Whos weyou ask?

Rebeccah Landerholm – Chief Executive Officer

rebeccah-landerholmRebeccah is from Seattle, Wa. and comes from a family of farmers and doctors. She studied professional writing, geography, and meteorology at Kutztown University before moving to Florida, where she worked as a Business Office Manager for a senior living nonprofit. Currently, she studies at Bastyr University in Kenmore, Wa., where she has already received her Permaculture Design Certificate. Rebeccah manages the cultivation, culinary, and design departments of the Landerholmstead.

Oliver Smith – Chief Operating Officer
Oliver Smith

Oliver was born in Essex and raised in Gettysburg, Pa. He received his B.S. in Electronic Media and a minor in business at Kutztown University. Oliver works as a Studio Op Associate at Amazon. In his free time, he streams on Twitch. Give him a follow! Oliver manages the maintenance department.

 

Dillon Stickle – Executive Administrator

dillonstickle_300xDillon is from Bethlehem, Pa. and attended Kutztown University where he studied professional writing. He went on to become a marketing coordinator for a historical nonprofit and eventually to work at a national healthcare magazine as an editorial assistant. Dillon has a strong passion for animals, the environment, and holistic practices and plans on extending his education toward those fields. He manages the animal, wellness, and administrative departments.

Each one of us wants to help make a difference; so we decided to do it together. The Landerholmstead is inspired by a natural compulsion to help save the planet, empower other people, and create a global community in which we all work together as a community rather than separate beings. We hope you follow our journey to creating our first, and most certainly not last, homestead to see our dreams turn to reality.

Be sure to catch our future blog posts where we will discuss things like agriculture, sustainability, tips and instructions, social philosophies and more. Well also give you the scoop on the The Landerholmsteads progress.

Thanks for reading. Be sure to give us a follow on Facebook. We’re excited for you to be a part of our destiny!


*While we are not yet an established corporation/nonprofit we will refer to our purpose as a movement. Here is our timeline for our goal of nonprofit status:
  • Established as a corporation in WA state – December 2016
  • Apply for IRS 501(c)3 exemption to gain nonprofit corporation status – March 2017

 

© The Landerholmstead, 2016.

Vermicomposting: Instructions for a DIY Upcycled Worm Bin Composter

Hello and welcome to the Landerholmstead!

We are excited to tell our story and share instructions for DIY projects as we experiment on the road to self sufficiency.

So first things first: Composting!

Hopefully you already know the value of compost, but if not, check out 5 Reasons Why Composting is the Greenest Thing You Can Do.

There are numerous ways you can compost, but today we’re focusing on vermicomposting: using red wiggler worms to break down organic matter into nutrient dense worm castings – yes, worm poop.

Planet Natural refers to worm castings as a “Plant Superfood”, and explains how vermicomposting “refines” your composted materials, reducing “nutrients, including minerals… to their most usable form.”

Although castings are incredibly nutrient dense, they cannot damage your plants with chemical burns (like many on-the-market fertilizers) because they are coated in a mucus that causes nutrients to slowly leach into the soil. This also means their effects will last much longer than chemical or other fertilizers!

Additionally, worms are being researched for their ability to detoxify soil, meaning you may not have to restrict what organic materials are added to your composter: your worms remove toxins and make it safe for garden use!

And one extra bonus – worm castings are odorless! So no matter how many stinky things you put into it, the final product won’t affect the smell of your landscaping.

food-waste-composting-free-natural-nutrient-rich-soil-for-your-garden-with-minimal-effort-via-everything-needs-cheese

Now, what do you need to get started??

Supplies:

    • Plastic bin, any size. Size will only affect how much you can compost at once.
      • Great way to upcycle unused and space-consuming storage boxes!
    • Drill + large drill bit
    • Red Wiggler Worms <— purchase here and you’re supporting our blog and homestead! (Read how)
    • Handful of soil
    • Newspaper, shredded in strips
    • Compostable materials (Produce scraps, eggshells, coffee grounds, yard waste, lawn trimmings, etc.)
    • Cardboard – optional
    • Helper dog – also optional

 

lolly-our-plastic-storage-container-for-a-diy-worm-bin-via-everything-needs-cheese

drill-10-20-holes-in-the-bottom-of-the-storage-container-diy-worm-bin-instructions-via-everything-needs-cheeseSteps:

  1. Drill alternating holes in the bottom of the bin. (These give the worms an escape-route in case of too much or too little heat, water, or food. Don’t worry, as long as you keep adding food to the top, the worms will keep coming back for food. This just ensures their survivability!)
    • We started with 10 holes in our approximately 12″ x 18″ x 12″ bin. After later observing standing liquid in the bottom of the bin, we increased their size and added 4 more for a total of 14.
  2. Add a handful or two of soil, just enough to cover the bottom of the bin.
    • Any soil will do for this, no need to purchase a specific type. Grab a handful from your yard and you’re good to go!
  3. Top the dirt with your Red Wigglers.
  4. Carefully add your initial compostable materials
    • Your worms will require semi-regular feeding. The more food you add, the more they will reproduce, and vice versa. For this reason, make it easy for yourself! If you know you’ll dump the day’s end food scraps in their every evening, great! Just be consistent and monitor the levels of food to worms, worms to food.
  5. Finish with a layer of newspaper and cardboard, if using.
    • If you live in an area with seasonal fruit fly problems, load up on this top layer!

red-wiggler-worms-eggs-for-vermiculture-composting-via-everything-needs-cheese

This post was originally on one of our sister sites: Everything Needs Cheese, which will exclusively share food-related posts henceforth.

Please comment below if you’ve tried this or other composting methods! 🙂


© The Landerholmstead, 2016.